The Ministry of Health is set to conduct a feasibility study to investigate the possibility of making the “Ambulance” and “Home visit” services a  public-private partnership.

“The tender announced by the Ministry of Health is open on November 3 and the close for bids is on November 14. This procurement refers to an offer for the preparation of a feasibility study and analysis of the opportunities and capacities of the “Ambulance” and “Home visit” services. The feasibility study should show whether this model of public-private partnership, which works in other countries, is possible at all, to function in our country. Information reported by some of the  media that a tender for public-private partnership has been announced is not correct, as we are only for assessing the possibility for it,” the Ministry of Health informs.

OglasThey went on to say that after the results of the analysis are finished, they will organize a public debate, where the results will be presented, and together with experts, the best solution will be made regarding this issue.

“Public health in recent years has shown poor results in regards to the management of the Emergency Services. Therefore, we are now looking for ways to improve the situation and offer better conditions for citizens,” the Ministry of Health said.

They explain that the model of public private partnership for ambulances works in Italy.

According to political party “Levica”, the argument for the privatization of Emergency Services is ridiculous.

“The argument that the services are non-functioning from the part that intends to privatize, then that argument is ridiculous (Public health in recent years has shown poor results in regards to the management of the Emergency Services). There is no market for the “Ambulance” to claim that competition has destroyed the country. With this argument, the government simply acknowledges that it is not capable of staffing and organizing the education and promotion of this part of health care. And if it is not capable, then the solution is to resign, not to privatize,” says “Levica”.

Professor Mirjana Najcevska says that we need a minister who will set up a health care system.

“We need a minister who will put the health care system in place, and not someone who will turn it into a market and prolong the metastasized corruption or someone to squander the little that remains in public protection. How can a private individual who wants to earn and make extra profits provide a better service,” Najcevska says.